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    mattwilson9090

    There may be one that would work on android, but actually doing so is not recommended.

    OpenDNS Home is not intended for mobile devices. Like the name implies it is intended for your home network only. You should run the updater on a computer connected to your network, or if it has the capability, some other device on your network such as your router.

    Even if you do get an updater on your mobile device, you'll be attempting to claim someone else's network address as your own whenever you connect to their Wi-Fi, and you will leave your home network unrpotected by OpenDNS because you'd have changed the IP address associated with your network.

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    rsampaio

    It doesn't make any sense saying that you can't have a mobile client because it's mobile. I have tablets and mobile phones at home, everytime my IP changes, I have to manually update using the browser. It's not even close to be user friendly. There are many ways to set the client to run only at home, like SSID, router MAC, geo location,...

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    rotblitz

    You're right.  Why don't you download one from Google Play?  Or what do you want to say us here?

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    everlevel (Edited )

    Android is not only for mobile devices. This is a link to 900+ non mobile Android computers (customed for TV but quite usable as stand alone computers).

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/TV-Reception-Set-Top-Boxes/15069/i.html?_sop=15&_nkw=android%20tv&_dcat=15069&rt=nc&_mPrRngCbx=1&_udlo=15&_udhi

    We use an old Android box to run dyndns, parental controls and other background tasks that our router can't  do on its own. It doesn't make sense that there isn't an openDNS updater for Android.

    As for PlayStore many things call themselves DNS updaters but are not they are DNS entry editors. 

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    tgi007 (Edited )

    The Android client I've been using for more than 5 years with great success is "Dynamic DNS client" by Neil Boyd (search Google Play Apps for "org.l6n.dyndns", and DO put the double-quotes around it). Usual Disclaimer: I'm not in any way affiliated with the app -- just a very satisfied user.

    Actually, there are valid reasons for using a dynamic DNS updater client on an Android mobile device.

    And, no, having my phone's IP address kept current as I roam about on various networks does NOT "claim someone else's network address as your own" in any way.

    Nor does it have ANY effect on my home network, which uses a different OpenDNS host name ("home.domain.com" versus "phone.domain.com", for example).

    To assert that when you change your dynamic DNS address you will "leave your home network unrpotected by OpenDNS" simply means that you don't understand the product you're using. Setting your home (and/or mobile) clients to use OpenDNS as that device's (or network's) DNS service provider is where you derive "protection".

    That is completely separate from, and unaffected by, dynamic DNS, in which a fixed "name" (such as "martha-iphone-5@opendns.com") maps to whatever her phone has managed to connect to (allowing for the few moments between a new address being assigned, and the dynamic DNS updater client detecting, and reporting, the change).

    Whether the latter functionality is useful to you depends on what you're trying to accomplish.

    For me, it's making my Android phone (and laptop, and tablet, and ...) reachable on the Internet as if it were a web site server. For my purposes, that is precisely what I need dynamic DNS to do for me. This is not a typical need for most people. But when I need to allow others to retrieve a file from my phone, or download a batch of photo samples from my laptop while I'm in a taxi, dynamic DNS is exactly what I need.

    --tgi

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    mattwilson9090

    Actually, registering any IP address to a network on your OpenDNS dashboard does indeed claim that address as your own. It is REGISTERED to your own account, and you are the one who controls the OpenDNS settings associated with it. Even if they aren't currently using OpenDNS, it is registered and claimed as yours until it is somewhow released from your account. That is just one of several reasons why dynamic updaters are not suggested with mobile devices.

    And yes, I do very well understand OpenDNS. I also understand that the vast majority of OpenDNS users will only ever use one network with their account, so yes, when they register a different IP address with their account they will indeed leave their home network unprotected.

    I have no idea why you even brought up DDNS in this little rant about how you know better than everyone else. rotblitz and I know very well what DDNS and it was not even mentioned in this thread. DDNS is completely unrelated to OpenDNS so there was no point in even mentioning it here.

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    tgi007

    Sorry, my error. I apparently misunderstood "Dynamic IP Updater for Android" (original question title) and "Is there a Dynamic IP Updater for Android that anyone can recommend?" (original question) as referring to Dynamic DNS.

    Apologies.

    --tgi

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    rladams65

    No, there are no Android clients for open dns dynamic ip updater that I can find in August 2018. I was hoping I could set up an old phone to keep the IP up to date, but that doesn't seem possible.

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    rotblitz (Edited )

    Why do you say "there are no Android clients for open dns dynamic ip updater"?

    There is at least one.
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.icecoldapps.dynamicdnsupdate

    For OpenDNS updates you go through DNS-O-Matic, or use the custom URL:

    https://updates.opendns.com/nic/update?hostname=networklabel

     

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