Problem with Nintendo 3DS XL and WLAN

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    rotblitz

    "I can't connect to the internet with my 3DS XL."

    Does your Nintendo establish a viable TCP/IP connection via WLAN at all?  Nintendo devices have limited support for certain WLAN encryption methods, because WLAN connectivity is almost established via application, not via OS as with other devices.  As far as I know, the OS only supports WEP, not WPA or WPA2.  Seach the internet for more insights.  There is a special Nintendo adapter available which supports the full range of WLAN standards.

    "My setup is a Arris Modem I got from my provider (Kabel Deutschland, a major provider here in Germany) which then goes into a devolo dLAN 500 AV Wireless+."

    If you have the OpenDNS resolver addresses configured there, you shouldn't need to configure them on any end devices.

    "If I set the IP manually I choose an internal IP adress 192.168.100.xxx since the Modem has the internal ip adress 192.168.100.1 (and subnet mask is 255.255.255.0) so my choice should be fine?"

    This static IP address (192.168.100.xxx) must be outside the address range of the router's DHCP server.  However, I do not see a need to configure static TCP/IP settings.  Best is to obtain the network settings automatically via DHCP from the router.

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    reginos

    Hello there, thanks for your response!

    The 3DS XL actually Supports WP2 (TKIP/AES) so you only need the adapter if you want to play old ds games online. 

    The Open DNS Servers are not configured on the modem. Since I got it from my provider I cannot edit much there (As far as I know they don't allow it at all).

    I mean if I set up a IP like I described above, it seems to connect to the wlan but can't connect to the internet. If I set it to an automatic IP and automatic DNS (or OpenDNS for the matter) it does not even connect to the WLAN and that confuses me.

     

    I thought, that the modem is "simpler" in the way that it forwards requests (I don't mean blindly) to the outside unlike a router that gives out internal ip addresses to different machines (amongst other things)?

     

    I mean I could fix this pretty easily, I think, by setting up an old router that should be somewhere in the house but it annoys me, that I bought this piece of hardware which I can't use to its full potential :/ It just doesn't feel "right" if you know what I mean...

     

    So if I set up a IP it has to be an external address, right? Can I set it to one of my OpenDNS network I also use for my pc? Or does the hardware in question need the openDNS Updater?

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    rotblitz

    "I thought, that the modem is "simpler" in the way that it forwards requests (I don't mean blindly) to the outside unlike a router that gives out internal ip addresses to different machines (amongst other things)?"

    If this device works in bridged mode, yes.  But if it works in NAT mode, then it is a router too, with DHCP server and such stuff.  Your IP address examples seem to confirm this.  Also, you have this "devolo dLAN 500 AV Wireless+" where you want to connect the Nintendos to.  This is most likely a router, i.e. NAT device.

    "So if I set up a IP it has to be an external address, right?"

    Certainly not.  If your modem worked in bridged mode, and the devolo device isn't involved, then the external IP address is assigned by your ISP.  You don't have the power to set or change it.  In every other case your IP addressing is private and internal with full control over it.  So you'll be using your internal address scheme, either static or DHCP controlled.

    "Can I set it to one of my OpenDNS network I also use for my pc?"

    You have an external and public IP address assigned to your PC?  Weird and dangerous!  Post the complete plain text output of "ipconfig /all" so that I understand.

    "Or does the hardware in question need the openDNS Updater?"

    The Updater is for a totally different purpose.  It reports your public IP address information to OpenDNS, so that OpenDNS can associate your DNS queries with your network settings.

    Proposals how to continue:

    First try from another device (e.g. a PC) which is connected the same way as the Nintendo whether or not you can use OpenDNS at all:
    nslookup  -type=txt  debug.opendns.com.  208.67.220.220
    nslookup  www.example.com.  208.67.220.220

    Also check with a browser that you have internet connectivity by e.g. visiting http://welcome.opendns.com/ .

    Only if yes:

    If the Nintendo allows configuring static DNS server addresses without configuring a static IP address, then go for this.

    If you must configure a static IP address to become able to configure static DNS server addresses, then the IP address must be within the LAN facing IP address range of the router you connect it to, but outside the DHCP range of this router, netmask the same as the router's and gateway the IP address of the router, and finally the OpenDNS resolver addresses as DNS server addresses.

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    subterfuge96

    Reginos,

    Is your Arris a modem/router because you need a router with wireless capability to connect wireless. Reason I ask is because I have an Arris modem without wireless features therefore I have to attached it to a router [In my case a tweaked Linksys with DD-WRT firmware] with wireless capability. Is your dLAN a wireless router? If so is the firmware updated?

     

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