Fix Video on Popular Sites

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    rotblitz

    But this is the only technology a DNS service can work with.  All of this can work with domain names only.  For the domain name system there are no videos, images, web pages or other such objects.  Other (non-DNS based) services may be able to do what you're looking for.  Not so DNS based services.

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    dhonan

    True - but is can't be that hard to scan the most popular websites and make sure all their domains are unblocked. 

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    mattwilson9090

    How is a DNS service supposed to scan popular websites for specific kinds of content and then unblock them? Unblock them for whom? Everyone using the service, or just those who don't have a particular category blocked?

    What if the website doesn't work because they have made content from another domain integral to how their website works, and the site will be broken if that domain isn't allowed to work? One example of this is advertising, and if you happened to block a particular advertisers domain it could easily break some websites that are built around it. How is OpenDNS supposed to scan the internet for those types of situations and "make them work" when the dependency is on a domain that is not the domain of the website you are trying to visit?

    Right now if a particular domain belongs to a category you are not blocking or you have whitelisted that particular domain then it's corresponding website will not be blocked in any way by OpenDNS. If the builders of that website opt to make their website dependent on other domains to work properly then the designers of that website need to fix that. There is no way for an automated scan of DNS to uncover those kinds of dependencies or to magically make them work when the website was so poorly designed in the first place.

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    dhonan

    Let's take a step back and look at OpenDNS' basic goal: Personal Internet Security - The easiest way to make your Internet safer, faster and more reliable!  They tout how SIMPLE it is, how FAST and EASY it is.  ESPN, as one example, is one of the most heavily trafficked sites on the Internet and one of the most popular among sports enthusiasts, yet it doesn't work out of the box on OpenDNS.  Are most people going to dig through the html source to find all the domains they use to server up video (we're not talking ads here - we're talking sports videos that are crucial to the overall experience).  The approach used by ESPN is used throughout the industry - they are not a one off.

    So let's stop trashing the concept and figure out a way to make OpenDNS truly simple and easy to use!!!!

     

     

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    rotblitz

    "it doesn't work out of the box on OpenDNS."

    Really?  Why this?  It does!  OpenDNS doesn't block anything by default but phishing domains and some malware domains.
    You do not need to unblock anything "by default".  So, what are you concerned about?  Definitely, you do it wrong.

    "a customer should not have to dig into the HTML to figure out which sites and to unblock"

    Really true.  You don't need to.  Let others do it for you, e.g. http://www.webpagetest.org/domains.php?test=141204_10_WFA&run=1&cached=0

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    mattwilson9090

    I have no idea how heavily trafficked ESPN is compared to other websites as I've never seen those numbers, but I have no doubt that it's very popular, at least in the US. That said, I have no interest in ESPN and can't recall ever visiting it on my main computer. That as close to out of the box as I can get without creating an entirely new OpenDNS account. After disabling my adblock software for ESPN I was able to play any of the videos I clicked on with no problem. OpenDNS in no way interfered with them. That tells me that ESPN's website is heavily integrated with their advertisers, and will not function properly with all of it's features unless you let the ads through. That's not uncommon, but many websites do put up some sort of notice that videos or other features will not work unless ads are allowed. Again, that has nothing to do with OpenDNS.

    As with rotblitz I don't understand what you mean that ESPN won't work out of the box, since it did work for me, "out of the box".

    I have used OpenDNS for years (I'd guess at least 5, but it could be longer) and have never had to dig through html source code to unblock some domain that I need to identify and unblock in order to visit some site or get some feature on a site to work. I've never heard that anyone else I've set up OpenDNS for has needed to do that, nor have they asked me to do it for them.

    What is your concept? For OpenDNS to identify all of the other domains referenced on a website that belongs to an allowed domain, and allow them through because of the "parent" domain, even if that referenced domain belongs to a category, such as adware or porn, that someone wants blocked? DNS (not just OpenDNS) knows nothing about websites or content, it only handles lookups for domains. So if you visit a website that references something on another domain a DNS lookup is performed and the results returned. It has no idea if that lookup was for a part of a page you are already looking at, a different page, or whether you might be trying to send an email to someone at that domain. What could OpenDNS to change those fundamental elements of how DNS works? Manually visit every website that loads content from a different domain and somehow "grandfather" them under the domain of the "parent" website? What if someone really does not want content from those other domains to be on their network, but it's allowed in anyway because it's "grandfathered" under a different domain's classification. They would have to constantly be visiting every website on the domain to check for altered content that was accessing different domains. With ads in particular that can be a frequently changing thing, so they'd have to do it multiple times a day.

    OpenDNS has always been simple and easy for me to use and I've had few problems for myself or those I support. Generally when there is an issue I just have to whitelist a particular domain, something that is made very easy to do since there is an option to click on a link that sends me an email preconfigured with everything I need. Three or so clicks and it's done. It couldn't be simpler.

     

    I have no way of knowing, but I'm wondering just how many categories are marked as blocked in your network. I suspect it's a pretty large percentage of the available categories, which is going to cause increasing difficulties on websites that rely on other domains to provide content or functionality. As it should, since those domains need to follow the rules for the categories they belong to, not the categories that a different domain belongs to.

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