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    rotblitz

    That would be possible only if the MAC address would be part of the DNS protocol - but it isn't, because this is not how the internet works.

    However, with a Netgear router with Live Parental Controls enabled you can create bypass accounts with "the ability to bypass all filtering based on the" user ID of this bypass account.  Isn't this what you're looking for?
    http://www.netgear.com/lpc

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    madparris21

    Is MAC address info part of IPV6?

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    madparris21

    I used Netgear router with Live Parental Controls but it blocks channels on my Rokus and I want a simple way to not block those devices.

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    rotblitz

    "Is MAC address info part of IPV6?"

    No, the MAC address is usually not part of any standard internet protocol.  In certain cases where this has been explicitly programmed within special applications on either end, the server and the client, it may be part of the data being exchanged.  But OpenDNS uses the normal standard protocols to be compatible with the usual networking programs and the internet standards.

    "I used Netgear router with Live Parental Controls but it blocks channels on my Rokus and I want a simple way to not block those devices."

    This is not possible with Netgear Live Parental Controls unless you disable any filtering/blocking or whitelist the domain names used by ROKU.

    It may be better you disabled Live Parental Controls on the router and configure it for using the normal OpenDNS Home Basic.

    You can configure a different (non-OpenDNS) on the ROKU devices then.  Or you can easier identify the domains to be whitelisted to make it work.

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    mattwilson9090

    Actually, that's not exactly accurate regarding IPv6 and MAC address.

    A strict interpretation of the IPv6 specs requires IPv6 addresses that are generated via SLAAC to use the 48-bit (I think that's the number I might be wrong there) and "pad" it out to 64-bits on the assumption that you'll be getting a 64-bit prefix. Basically, assuming someone doesn't "assign" a new MAC address to their interface all IPv6 addresses could be tracked back to a specific network interface. A lot of people did not like that, basically on privacy grounds and so the spec was amended so that the entire 64-bit address could be randomized, with provisions for changing the address periodically. For regular user devices such as comptuers or smartphones that's fine and does address the privacy concern, but "purists" don't like it primarily because it's no longer "pure" solution.

    "Modern" operating system all use this privacy feature, but it can be disabled.

    However, all of this is irrelevant since OpenDNS does not support IPv6 yet, and IPv6 information is not being logged. And even it were logged, unless someone specifically turns off the IPv6 privacy features most IPv6 addresses will not have a direct mechanism to trace them back to a specific piece of hardware.

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