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    rotblitz

    Not really ideas. Would you have an idea if this happened to me? You should know your network, not we other users...

    As a general hint: some networking application in your network seems keeping attempts to connect to Yahoo, and because it doesn't find what it looks for under the DNS information returned by OpenDNS (because you blocked it), it tries again and again, until success, which is never, so until forever...

    What could try to reach out to Yahoo? A tool bar? A mail client program? A browser having configured Yahoo as default search engine? Some smart device running a Yahoo app? Could be anything, and you should know. Most programs do not evidently complain if they cannot reach out to a site.

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    christopher.owen

    Thank you for the reply.

    It had requested roughly the same amount of times prior to me blocking the domain - so no change because it's been blocked.

    And no I don't have any any of them programs running - that I know of. It probably is some ad server thing on my phone maybe.

    Anyway I'll have to have a look. As you say it is on my network, I just thought that there may be a specific known cause relating to yahoo.

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    cervezafria

    Yahoo Messenger?

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    maintenance

    "Yahoo requests" - to what domain(s)? Yahoo provides services that other websites use, including YUI CSS/Javascript libraries and API.

    Blocking www.yahoo.com will block exactly that domain and any subdomain of www.yahoo.com, but not yahoo.com or subdomains thereof.

    You may wish to be aware of these if you research your stats further.

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    tgr82
    Was wondering the same thing. Im new to opendns and I'm not technically minded.... when it comes to the lists of domains on the reports of domains, I have heaps of **.**.yahoo and also twitter.... No one users twitter so that's got me really stumped. I figured the yahoo is showing up due to the bots and search engine yahoo provide? Does twitter run other sites?
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    maintenance

    It's not about running other sites, it's about what content is on a given web page. Every little ting you see on a page (a a lot of stuff you don't really see directly) comes from somewhere. And a lot of it isn't from the domain of the site you are visiting. So for Twitter lookups, think about all the little "Tweet This!" or whatever icons that are a link to Twitter. If nothing else (like a script), the little birdy image comes from a Twitter domain. And there are Twitter feeds or whatever on lots of sites. There is no telling how many times Twitter domains will be looked up for a given page. If your device doesn't cache DNS lookups, that makes the number bigger. If you are using a browser or app that does DNS and/or link prefetching by default, that's another whopping addition to the number of lookups.

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    maintenance

    Edit, please.  --- Every little *thing*...

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    rotblitz

    In addition to what maintenance said:

    "I figured the yahoo is showing up due to the bots and search engine yahoo provide?"

    No, Yahoo's bots are related to your DNS activity in no way.  They do not scan or spy you with their bots.  Yahoo is not only a search engine (you may use it as such?), but provides a lot of other services some networking application within your network may use.  Mail services and groups are just two of them.  DNS is not about webbrowsing only, but about almost all network activity nowadays.

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    Brian Hartvigsen

    However, any website that is utilizing Yahoo (for things such as ads, open-id logins, etc) will generate traffic that shows up in your reports.

    While you may not use twitter yourself, almost every website includes Twitter integrations (all those "tweet this" buttons you see generally cause you to make requests for twitter.com.)

    So, remember when looking at your logs that you are not just seeing traffic that you or another use entered directly into the browser or clicked via a link.  It also includes traffic from resources that those websites use (Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, etc are very common examples of this.)

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    tgr82

    I see.. Thanks so much!  I can actually understand everything you all have posted and its very useful!  Thanks again.  

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