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5 comments

  • Avatar
    rotblitz

    No, it does not take some time.  Post the complete plain text output of the following command here:

    nslookup -type=txt debug.opendns.com.

  • Avatar
    shan247

    nslookup -type=txt debug.opendns.com

  • Avatar
    shan247

    Server: UnKnown

    Address: 192.168.2.1

    *** UnKnown can't find debug.opendns.com: Non-existent domain

  • Avatar
    Patrick Colford

    @shan247

    That reads like your router is configured to be your DNS server, but that it isn't pointed at us. If it were, you would get output similar to this:

    Results for: nslookup -timeout=10 -type=txt debug.opendns.com.
    stdout:
    Server:  resolver1.opendns.com
    Address:  192.168.2.1
    debug.opendns.com	text =
    	"server 5.lon"
    debug.opendns.com	text =
    	"flags 20 0 70 5950800000000000000"
    debug.opendns.com	text =
    	"originid 0"
    debug.opendns.com	text =
    	"actype 0"
    debug.opendns.com	text =
    	"source 109.128.134.148:61031"
    
    stderr:
    Non-authoritative answer:

    Please check your router's DNS settings and make sure they're pointed to 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220.

  • Avatar
    rotblitz

    @shan247
    "i added the opendns ip in my router for dns"

    There's more than one OpenDNS resolver address.  Did you fill all DNS entries on your router with OpenDNS addresses?

    If you think your router is already configured correctly, you may want to check if your ISP redirects your DNS queries to their DNS service, therefore preventing you from using 3rd party DNS services like OpenDNS.

       nslookup -type=txt debug.opendns.com. 208.67.220.220

    Or visit https://dnsleaktest.com/ to test it.

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