Comcast-compatible router that can disable ipv6

Comments

8 comments

  • Avatar
    rotblitz

    Disabling IPv6 is not the way to go.  Over time you'll run more often in situations where you cannot reach what you want to reach without IPv6, because many IPv6-only sites will come up more and more.

    If you want to use OpenDNS filtering and IPv6 connectivity, you must take care to send your DNS traffic through IPv4 only.  You can achieve this by using the following as DNSv6 resolver addresses:

    ::ffff:d043:dede  ::ffff:d043:dcdc  ::ffff:d043:dedc  ::ffff:d043:dcde

     

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    mattwilson9090

    If you don't want to use rotblitz method, or if the Comcast router doesn't allow using your own manually added IPv6 DNS resolver addresses your best bet is to add a router "inside" the router provided by Comcast and configure it there. In fact, I recommend doing this anyway, for a myriad of reasons, not just limited to Comcast and IPv6.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    emmyloula

    mattwilson9090 I just joined Comcast but couldn't use their modem/router with OpenDNS so I am using my own router (which is four years old and needs to be updated).  You seem very familiar with this situation - can you possibly tell me what features I should be looking for in a new router that will be fast enough for Comcast (75mbps) but allow OpenDNS configuration?  I also love the parental controls of my old Cisco router if you know anything about that (device specific filtering / connection restrictions)

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    rotblitz

    It seems that mattwilson9090 is not available just now.

    https://en.avm.de/products/fritzbox/
    These routers can be used with VDSL2 connections, and OpenDNS can be configured, inc. dynamic IP address updates.  And you do not need to disable IPv6 but can continue to use it if you enter the resolver addresses I listed above.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    mattwilson9090

    @ehb1476 As rotblitz said, I wasn't able to respond for a few days.

    I can't tell you what features you should be looking for since I don't know your actual requirements, aside from 75 Mbps throughput, which is presumably the speed you are paying for now. We know nothing about your network, number of devices, users, what kind of traffic you'll be sending and receiving, WiFi requirements (again speed, type and number of devices and users), etc. and any number of things.

    As for your Cisco router I can't tell you if I know anything about it or not since you didn't say what model it is. That's like saying your car is a Ford without actually saying what model it is.

    As for me, I personally have chosen to use third-party firmware due to additional options it provides, in this case the Toastman variation of Tomato. Unfortunately that does limit my router firmware choices, and until recently couldn't run on any of the newest hardware that uses ARM processors. For my hardware I'm currently using an ASUS RT-N66U, which I chose partially for it's larger amount of memory, 802.11n Wi-Fi and enough throughput to support the 100 Mbps up and down I'd be getting when I switched to a fiber connection. I knew it wouldn't support 802.11ac, but that didn't bother me. However, the ISP provided a free upgrade for everyone to 300Mbps and I can only get 125 Mbps up and down with this new hardware so I'm looking for new hardware that can support the speed I'm getting now.

    All this is a long way of explaining that you need to know your own needs and requirements before you start specifying router hardware or software.  Your answers to that will likely lead you down a different path than the one I took.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    psimmond

    mattwilson9090 I know this is an old thread, but I was wondering why it would be best to "add a router 'inside' the router provided" rather than just replace the router that was provided. Thanks.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    mattwilson9090

    @psimmond One of the main reasons for using your own router is that quite frankly, often the modem/router provided by an ISP sucks. Features, and ability to change them is often limited, something that many OpenDNS users have discovered when trying to chance IPv4 or IPv6 settings.

    Firmware is often old and outdated, with no way to update the firmware on their own. If the ISP updates the firmware remotely (and usually without notification) it frequently wipes out any customizations you've made to the network configuration. In addition, when working on a problem ISP's frequently replace the modem as a mater of course, without bothering to figure out if that's the source of the problem. That frequently results in completely changing your own internal network, and you either have to reconfigure the router or your entire network.

    Decent routers are relatively cheap and avoid all of the pitfalls of relying on the crap provided by your ISP, while also providing features security and features.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    psimmond

    Thanks mattwilson9090. I ordered a TP-Link but I planned to just replace the provider's router with the new one when it gets here. It just sounded to me like you were saying I should keep theirs and put mine inside of it. I just couldn't think of a good reason to keep using theirs.

     

    0
    Comment actions Permalink

Please sign in to leave a comment.